11 Best Weight Lifting Belts For 2022

11 Best Weight Lifting Belts

11 Best Weight Lifting Belts For 2022

11 Best Weight Lifting Belts

Weight lifting belts are designed to help maintain abdominal pressure and a neutral spine during heavy lifting. They can help provide additional support to big lifts and movements that require a lot of core stabilization, like deadlifts.

With that said, lifting belts are not designed to make lifting with poor form safe, or an excuse to lift more than what you’re able to without one.

There are many different types of weightlifting belts available on the market, so it’s important to choose one that’s comfortable and fits your body properly. In this article, we’ll give you our top pick for weightlifting belts in a variety of categories.

Best weight lifting belt categories we'll cover include:

And if you want to learn more about weight lifting belts and how to choose one, jump down to our FAQs!

Let’s dive in.

Note: Pricing is subject to change or may vary based on where you purchase and current sales.

Best Leather Weightlifting Belt

1. TITAN MAXXUM LIFTING BELTS

  • Material: Leather
  • Closure: Prong
  • Price: $63-$80
  • Sizing: S-3XL (21"-50")

If you’re looking for a top-quality leather weightlifting belt, the Titan Maxxum Lifting Belt is our top pick. With 6 sizes to choose from for support, the 4″ wide belt offers a single-prong design that allows you to quickly adjust to your needs.

Best Velcro Weightlifting Belt

2. GRIZZLY 6” BEAR HUGGER TRAINING BELT

  • Material: Nylon
  • Closure: Velcro with Roller Buckle
  • Price: $33
  • Sizing: S-2XL (23"-52")

The Grizzly 6” Bear Hugger Training Belt is our top pick for the best velcro weightlifting belt. Appropriate for both men and women, the belt provides a great deal of comfort and doesn’t dig into hips. The lightweight material with padding allows it to have a close fit to your body shape.

Best Weightlifting Belt For Women

3. ROGUE 3" OHIO BELT

  • Material: Leather
  • Closure: Double Prong Buckle
  • Price: $115-$120
  • Sizing: S-2XL (21"-45")

The Rogue 3″ Ohio Belt is our top pick for the best weightlifting belt for women. With a variety of colors and sizes available, this belt is made from vegetable-tanned leather and features a double-prong buckle closure. It’s a great belt for women and smaller athletes because of the reduced belt width. It provides support, while not digging into the ribs or hips or affecting the back arch.

Best Weightlifting Belt For Men

4. TOOMEY USA NYLON LIFTING BELT

  • Material: Nylon
  • Closure: Buckle and Roller with velcro and additional elastic loops
  • Price: $75
  • Sizing: XS-3XL (26"-47")

The Toomey USA Nylon Lifting Belt is our top pick for the best weightlifting belt for men. The belt has a tapered design that measures 2.75″-4.5″. The offset roller reduces the risk of catching your bar on the buckle. The belt was designed for comfort and performance while keeping it in place. This is great for men who may worry about the belt popping off in circuit training.

Best Weightlifting Belt For Crossfit

5. ROGUE USA NYLON LIFTING BELT

  • Material: Nylon
  • Closure: Buckle and Roller with velcro
  • Price: $60
  • Sizing: XS-3XL (26"-47")

Our choice for the best Crossfit belt goes to Rogue USA Nylon Lifting Belt. The patented belt was co-developed by Mat Fraser, who used it to gain five straight CrossFit titles. The belt comes in a variety of colors and sizes, making it a great option.

The nylon material is comfortable and won’t dig into your hips. The velcro closure is also secure, yet easy to take on and off.

Best Budget Weightlifting Belt

6. GRIZZLY 4” PADDED PACESETTER TRAINING BELT

  • Material: Nylon
  • Closure: Double-prong buckle
  • Price: $27.50
  • Sizing: S-2XL (23"-52")

The Grizzly 4” Padded Pacesetter Training Belt is our top pick for the best budget weightlifting belt. Used by the pros, it’s made from high-quality Nylon and includes padding for extra comfort while getting the utmost support.

Best Nylon Weightlifting Belt

7. ROGUE 5" NYLON WEIGHTLIFTING BELT

  • Material: Nylon
  • Closure: Velcro with a steel tensioning buckle
  • Price: $23
  • Sizing: XS-2XL (26"-46")

The Rogue 5″ Nylon Weightlifting Belt is our top pick for the best nylon weightlifting belt. The robust belt was designed for those who require extra support during their lifts and need to quickly adjust the belt when moving between exercises.

Best Weightlifting Belt For Powerlifting

8. ROGUE 13MM POWERLIFTING BELT

  • Material: Nylon
  • Closure: Buckle and Roller with velcro
  • Price: $60
  • Sizing: XS-3XL (26"-47")

The Rogue 13MM Powerlifting Belt is our top pick for the best weightlifting belt for powerlifting. The thick, heavy-duty belt is made from genuine leather and features a single-pronged buckle closure. With an inside suede lining for firm grip, it’s designed to provide maximum support during heavy lifting and meets most powerlifting federation requirements.

Best Weightlifting Belt For Beginners

9. ROGUE 4" NYLON WEIGHTLIFTING BELT

  • Material: Nylon
  • Closure: Velcro with steel tensioning buckle
  • Price: $22
  • Sizing: XS-2XL (26"-46")

The Rogue 4″ Nylon Weightlifting Belt is our top pick for the best weightlifting belt for beginners. The lightweight and comfortable belt is made from nylon and features a velcro closure. It’s a great belt for those just starting out because it’s easy to take on and off and won’t break the bank.

FAQ's

Weight lifting belts are designed to help maintain abdominal pressure and a neutral spine during heavy lifting. They can help provide additional support to big lifts and movements that require a lot of core stabilization, like deadlifts.

Most people wear weightlifting belts during heavy lifts that require a lot of core stabilization, such as deadlifts. However, you can wear it during any lift you’d like, as long as it doesn’t impact your form.

The best type of weightlifting belt depends on your needs and preferences. For example, some people prefer leather belts because they’re more durable, while others prefer velcro belts because they’re easier to take on and off. If you’re not sure what type of belt is best for you, ask a coach or personal trainer for help.

When choosing a weightlifting belt, it’s important to consider the material, width, and thickness. You also want to make sure the belt is comfortable and fits your body properly.

The best width for a weightlifting belt depends on your build and the type of lifting you’ll be doing. For example, powerlifters often prefer wider belts (4 inches or more) because they provide more support.

The best thickness for a weightlifting belt depends on your build and the type of lifting you’ll be doing. For instance, powerlifters often prefer thicker belts (13 mm or more) because they provide more support.

Most weightlifting belts are worn around the hips, with the belt positioned just above the hip bones. The belt should be snug but not so tight that it’s uncomfortable. To put on a belt with a buckle, thread the belt through the buckle and pull it tight. For a velcro belt, simply wrap the belt around your waist and fasten the velcro.

Bottom Line

A weightlifting belt can be a great addition to your lifting gear, but it’s important to choose the right belt for your needs. Consider the material, width, and thickness of the belt, as well as your own build and the type of lifting you’ll be doing.

Read more: Survey Results: The Best In Fitness & Personal Training for 2022

Eddie Lester

Eddie Lester

Eddie Lester is a personal trainer from Los Angeles and the Founder and CEO of Fitness Mentors. With over 10 years experience and 8 different certifications and specializations, as well as multiple years teaching training at a vocational college, Lester loves sharing his knowledge of practical training experience as well as how to study for PT exams. Lester is the author of Business and Sales: The Guide to Success as a Personal Trainer.

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7 Best Kettlebells for 2022 – A Buyer’s Guide

7 Best Kettlebells for 2022

7 Best Kettlebells for 2022 – A Buyer’s Guide

7 Best Kettlebells for 2022

Kettlebells are a great way to add some variety to your workout routine, and they can be extremely effective for both cardio and strength training. However, with so many different kettlebells on the market, it can be tough to know which one is right for you.

 

That’s why we’ve put together this buyer’s guide, which will help you choose the best kettlebell for your needs. We’ve also included our top picks in 7 different categories for the best kettlebells of 2022.

Categories we'll cover include:

 

If you want to learn more about buying kettlebells and how to choose the right product for you, skip down to our FAQs!

Note: Pricing is subject to change or may vary based on where you purchase and current sales.

7 Best Kettlebells for 2022

Best Adjustable Kettlebells

1. TITAN FITNESS ADJUSTABLE KETTLEBELL

  • Weight Range: 10lb - 40lb
  • Weight Increments: 4.5-lbs
  • Material: Cast Iron
  • Estimated Cost Per Unit: $80

The Titan Fitness Adjustable Kettlebell is a great choice if you’re looking for an adjustable kettlebell. It has a weight range of 10-40 pounds, making it perfect for both beginners and more experienced users. Simply add and remove discs to increase or decrease the weight.

This kettlebell is made from cast iron, which is extremely durable. It also has a powder-coat finish that protects it from rust and corrosion.

The Titan Fitness Adjustable Kettlebell is a great choice for people who want a durable kettlebell, and t’s also one of the most affordable options on our list since one weight gives you multiple options.

Best Competition Kettlebells

2. ROGUE COMPETITION KETTLEBELLS

  • Weight Range: ~17-106lbs
  • Weight Increments: 4-9lbs
  • Material: Cast Iron
  • Estimated Cost Per Unit: $70-$365

The Rogue Competition Kettlebells are some of the best kettlebells on the market. They’re made from competition-grade materials and precision-machined to ensure that they meet all of the standards for competition kettlebells.

These kettlebells are available in a wide range of sizes, from 8 kg all the way up to 48 kg (17-106lbs). They’re also color-coded by weight, so it’s easy to grab the right one.

The Rogue Competition Kettlebells are a great choice for people who want the best of the best. They’re also one of the more expensive options on our list.

Best Kettlebells For Home Gym

3. POWER SYSTEMS PREMIUM KETTLEBELL PRIME

  • Weight Range: 5-50lb
  • Weight Increments: 3-5lbs
  • Material: Cast Iron With Vinyl Covering
  • Estimated Cost Per Unit: $35-$102

The Power Systems Premium Kettlebell Prime is a great choice if you’re looking for a kettlebell to use in your home gym. It’s available in a wide range of weights from 5-50 pounds so that you can find the perfect weight for your needs.

This kettlebell is made from cast iron, which is extremely durable. It also has a vinyl-coat finish that protects it from rust and corrosion while giving it a high-end, smooth look. The contoured handle is easy to grip, and the wide base helps to keep the kettlebell stable when you’re working out.

Best Kettlebells For Beginners

4. TITAN KG CAST IRON KETTLEBELLS

  • Weight Range: ~9-71lbs
  • Weight Increments: ~4-9lbs
  • Material: Cast Iron
  • Estimated Cost Per Unit: $23-$120

The Titan KG Cast Iron Kettlebells are a great choice for people who are new to using kettlebells. They’re available in a wide range of weights to find the perfect weight for your needs. Beginning at just 4kg (about 9lbs), they’re a great choice for someone just getting started working out.

These kettlebells are made from cast iron, which is extremely durable. They also have a powder-coat finish that protects them from rust and corrosion while giving them a high-end, smooth look. The extra wide handles are easy to grip, and the wide, flat bases help keep the kettlebells stable when working out.

Best Value Kettlebells

5. ROGUE KETTLEBELL - E COAT

  • Weight Range: 9-88lb
  • Weight Increments: 4-8lbs
  • Material: Cast Iron With E-Coat Finish
  • Estimated Cost Per Unit: $30-$140

The Rogue Kettlebell – E Coat is a great choice if you’re looking for a kettlebell that offers great value. The American-made kettlebells offer a wide range of weights from 9-88 pounds to find the perfect weight for your needs at a good price.

This kettlebell is made from cast iron, which is extremely durable. It also has an E-coat finish that protects it from rust and corrosion while giving it a smooth, glossy finish that’s simple to clean. The contoured handle is easy to grip, and the wide base helps to keep the kettlebell stable when you’re working out.

The Rogue Kettlebell – E Coat is a great choice for people who want a kettlebell that looks great and offers great value.

Best Steel Kettlebells

6. TITAN KG COMPETITION KETTLEBELL

  • Weight Range: ~18-71lbs
  • Weight Increments: ~4lbs
  • Material: Steel
  • Estimated Cost Per Unit: $45-$117

The Titan KG Competition Kettlebell is a great option for steel kettlebells. Since it’s made from steel, it has a smooth, consistent finish. Available in 2 kg (~4lb) increments from 8-32kg (~18-71lbs), you can ensure you have a wide range of precise weights to choose from.

The kettlebell also has a wide handle for good easy gripping, a hollow core for better balance, and a flat base that allows for easy storage and the ability to use it for handstands.

Best Kettlebells For CrossFit

7. POWER SYSTEMS KETTLEBELL PRIME

  • Weight Range: 10-100lbs
  • Weight Increments: 5-10lbs
  • Material: Cast Iron With Textured Powder Coat Finish
  • Estimated Cost Per Unit: $34-$230

When it comes to a kettlebell for CrossFit, it’s important that it’s able to withstand the rigors of the workouts and offers versatility. Since CrossFit workouts can vary and include a multitude of workout types, the textured, matte powder coating on the Power Systems Kettlebell Prime help protect your hands from getting beat up and can be used with chalk.

The kettlebell is also color-coded by weight to make it easy to grab the right size.

FAQs For Best Kettlebells

The best weight to start with kettlebells depends on your fitness level and goals, there is no inherent “best”. If you’re new to lifting weights, we recommend starting with a lighter weight (8-12 kg) and gradually working your way up.

If you’re already familiar with lifting weights or are looking for a more challenging workout, you may want to start with a heavier kettlebell (16-24 kg).

The best way to store kettlebells is on a kettlebell rack, like this one. This will help keep your kettlebells organized and off the ground, prolonging their life.

There are three primary types of kettlebells: cast iron, steel, and adjustable. Cast iron kettlebells are the most common and affordable. Steel kettlebells are typically more expensive but are also more durable. Adjustable kettlebells allow you to change the weight of the kettlebell, which can be helpful if you want to use multiple weights for different exercises.

The number of kettlebells you need depends on your fitness goals and the types of exercises you want to do. If you’re just starting out, we recommend getting two kettlebells (one lighter and one heavier) so you can have some flexibility in your workouts.

If you’re looking for a more comprehensive workout routine, you may want to get multiple kettlebells in different weights. This will allow you to do a wider variety of exercises and target different muscle groups.

Kettlebells have the ability to work any muscle in the body, it all depends on how you use it. You can target specific muscle groups as well as full-body workouts.

How often you use kettlebells depends on your fitness goals, your workout space, and how many kettlebells you have available. They are simply another tool in your toolbox. We recommend using kettlebells two to three times per week if you’re just starting out. As you become more familiar with the exercises and start to see results, you can increase the frequency of your workouts.

Kettlebells are typically made of cast iron, steel, or even plastic. Cast iron kettlebells are the most common, while steel kettlebells are preferred for experienced users because of the extra durability. Plastic kettlebells are the lightest type of kettlebell and are often used for rehabilitation or physical therapy.

Kettlebells are typically weighted in kilograms (kg) or pounds (lb). The weight of the kettlebell will determine how challenging the exercises are and which muscle groups are targeted.

Adjustable kettlebells have a weight that can be adjusted to create different weights in one kettlebell. Adjustable kettlebells are a good option if you want to use multiple weights for different exercises.

The main difference between a kettlebell and a dumbbell is the shape of the weight and handle, and thus the weight distribution. Kettlebells have a handle attached to a ball-shaped weight, while dumbbells have two weights attached to a bar.

The Bottom Line

Kettlebells are a great way to add variety to your workout routine and target different muscle groups. If you’re new to lifting weights, we recommend starting with a lighter weight and gradually working your way up.

 

If you’re looking for a more challenging workout, you may want to start with a heavier kettlebell. You can also use multiple kettlebells of different weights to create a more comprehensive workout routine.

 

Read more: Survey Results: The Best In Fitness & Personal Training for 2022

Eddie Lester

Eddie Lester

Eddie Lester is a personal trainer from Los Angeles and the Founder and CEO of Fitness Mentors. With over 10 years experience and 8 different certifications and specializations, as well as multiple years teaching training at a vocational college, Lester loves sharing his knowledge of practical training experience as well as how to study for PT exams. Lester is the author of Business and Sales: The Guide to Success as a Personal Trainer.

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Mass Gainers: 10 Best Protein Powders For Weight Gain

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Mass Gainers: 10 Best Protein Powders For Weight Gain

best weight gainers list

Have you been looking for a weight gain supplement that can help you gain mass quickly and safely? If so, then you’re in the right place! 

In this guide, we’re going to share our top picks for best protein powders for weight gain in different categories, as well as our pick for the overall best option under 1,000 calories and the best option over 1,000 calories.

#1 Best Selling Protein

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Here are our quick answers:

Now let’s get into the details about our picks and why. Stay to the end if you want to learn a bit more about mass gainers and using protein powder for weight gain – and see some frequently asked questions!

Note: Pricing is subject to change or may vary based on where you purchase and current sales.

Overall Best Protein Powder For Weight Gain Under 1,000 Calories Per Serving

1. Transparent Labs Mass Gainer

  • Calories per serving: 760
  • Carbs: 109g
  • Fat: 12g
  • Protein: 53g
  • Protein source: Grass-Fed Whey Protein
  • Flavors: Sweet Vanilla, Chocolate Glazed Donut
  • Largest tub size: 6.18 lbs (2.8 kg)
  • Servings per container: 15
  • Cost per serving: $4.67

Transparent Lab’s Mass Gainer is our top pick for a few reasons. First, the supplement is sweetened with stevia and monk fruit, so you don’t have the fake sugars that many mass gainers and protein powders contain. The carbohydrate sources are oats, sweet potatoes, and organic tapioca, which are also more natural.

Additionally, there are no artificial preservatives or coloring, and it’s gluten-free and non-GMO, making it a healthier option for your bulk.

The company itself is also reputable. Transparent Labs is a well-known brand for health supplements and bases its products on science, hard evidence, and unbiased studies.

Their independent advisory board includes personal trainers, clinical physiologists, medical doctors, and registered dieticians, so you know you’re getting a product with experts behind it.

Add in their 60-day money-back guarantee, and you can see why this is Fitness Mentors’ top choice!

Overall Best Protein Powder For Weight Gain Over 1,000 Calories Per Serving

2. Optimum Nutrition Serious Mass

  • Calories per serving: 1,250
  • Carbs: ~254g
  • Fat: ~4g
  • Protein: 50g
  • Protein source: Whey, Calcium Caseinate & Egg Whites
  • Flavors: Chocolate, Chocolate Peanut Butter, Strawberry, Vanilla
  • Largest tub size: 12 lbs (5.44kg)
  • Servings per container: 16
  • Cost per serving: $4.75

Optimum Nutrition is a brand built on using the highest quality raw ingredients in a state-of-the-art approach. Each product is tested and retested to ensure you know what’s going into your body.

The company’s Serious Mass product is our top choice overall for over 1,000 calories per serving protein powder because of the quality of what’s in it, including the addition of 25 vitamins and essential minerals.

The powder is also great mixed with other foods and liquids to add more flavor and calories, like fruits, milk, and nut butters – giving you endless options for a great meal replacement and workout fueler. 

Best Affordable Protein Powder For Weight Gain Under 1,000 Calories Per Serving

3. CytoSport Muscle Milk Gainer

  • Calories per serving: 650
  • Carbs: 109g
  • Fat: 9g
  • Protein: 32g
  • Protein source: Milk protein isolate, caseins, whey protein
  • Flavors: Cookies & Creme, Vanilla Creme, Chocolate
  • Largest tub size: 5 lb (2.27 kg)
  • Servings per container: 14
  • Cost per serving: $2.78

Despite proteins derived from dairy, this gainer is actually lactose-free and includes 20 vitamins and minerals, including calcium and electrolytes.

Muscle Milk Gainer contains a special Protein System that combines proteins from multiple sources to deliver them to your body over an extended period. These include faster-acting whey proteins and slower acting casein proteins to provide longer term gaining potential.

If you’re not looking to break the bank, this is a great choice for your gaining goals.

Best Affordable Protein Powder For Weight Gain Over 1,000 Calories Per Serving

4. Dymatize Super Mass Gainer

  • Calories per serving: 1280
  • Carbs: 252g
  • Fat: 4.5g
  • Protein: 50g
  • Protein source: Whey, casein, egg
  • Flavors: Rich Chocolate, Gourmet Vanilla, Cookies & Cream
  • Largest tub size: 6 lbs (2.7kg)
  • Servings per container: 16
  • Cost per serving: $2.68

Dymatize focuses on a special high-quality blend of complex carbohydrates to help build mass and keep your energy up. 

Each serving also includes 17g of BCAAs (Branched-Chain Amino Acids), which get depleted when you’re working out, as well as 7.7g of L-Leucine, an amino acid that helps activate protein synthesis in your muscles.

The flavors are delicious (our favorite is the Rich Chocolate), and the product mixes very well with both milk and water. In fact, mixing it with 32 ounces of whole milk will increase your calorie count to 1900 per serving if you are in need of a bit extra.So if you’re looking for some hefty calories and carbs, but want the lower cost, Dymatize Super Mass Gainer is a great choice.

Best Protein Powder For Weight Gain For Competitive Sports

5. Optimum Nutrition Gold Standard Gainer

  • Calories per serving: 750-770
  • Carbs: 109-116g
  • Fat: 9-10g
  • Protein: 55g
  • Protein source: Whey and isolates
  • Flavors: Colossal Chocolate, Vanilla Ice Cream
  • Largest tub size: 10.29 lb (4.67 kg)
  • Servings per container: 23
  • Cost per serving: $3.91

When it comes to competitive sports, it’s especially important to know what’s going into your body. 

Gold Standard Gainer is banned substance tested, so you can be assured it’s acceptable to take if you’re involved in competition.

This powder contains complete dairy proteins from mainly isolates and oat, pea and potato carbohydrates. Included fats come from flax, chia & MCTs for added benefits.

If you need a protein powder for weight gain that gives you a good source of carbs and proteins, but is tested to ensure you can use it in competitive sports, this is a great pick.

Top-Rated Protein Powder For Weight Gain By Customers

6. MuscleTech Mass-Tech Extreme 2000

  • Calories per serving: 2050
  • Carbs: 440g
  • Fat: 6g
  • Protein: 60g
  • Protein source: Whey
  • Flavors: Delicious Strawberry, Triple Chocolate Brownie, Vanilla Milkshake
  • Largest tub size: 22 lbs (9.98 kg)
  • Servings per container: 20
  • Cost per serving: $4.80

With thousands of verified 5-star ratings across multiple sites, MuscleTech Mass-Tech Extreme 2000 packs a ton of nutrients into a serving. 

Not only is it high in calories, carbs and protein, it also includes 10g of creatine and 20 vitamins and minerals, making it an ideal macronutrient profile for bulking up.

Some of the reviews boast “The most complete weight gainer on the market, very good flavor. Muscletech is one of my favorite brands” as well as “Mixes great, easy to digest, no grit, and great flavor”.

So if you’re looking for a weight gaining protein powder that has the backing of tons of people, this one might be the choice for you.

Best Vegan Protein Powder For Weight Gain

7. Vegan Naked Mass

  • Calories per serving: 1,230
  • Carbs: 248g
  • Fat: 4g
  • Protein: 50g
  • Protein source: Pea protein and brown rice protein
  • Flavors: Chocolate and Vanilla
  • Largest tub size: 8 lb (3.63 kg)
  • Servings per container: 11
  • Cost per serving: $5.91

Naked Nutrition’s Vegan Naked Mass combines pea protein and brown rice protein to give you a completely plant-based blend for your bulking goals.

We like this product because in addition to being vegan, it’s also free of artificial ingredients. You can count the ingredients on one hand, and they’re all recognizable –  while still including all 9 essential amino acids.

In addition, if you’re environmentally conscientious, the farming practices used to create the product are sustainable, which sets it apart from other vegan protein powders.

Best Protein Powder For Weight Gain With Lower Carbs

8. Optimum Nutrition Pro Gainer

  • Calories per serving: 1,010
  • Carbs: 170g
  • Fat: 8g
  • Protein: 64g
  • Protein source: Whey and isolates
  • Flavors: Vanilla, Chocolate, Strawberry Banana, Cookies & Cream and Chocolate Peanut Butter
  • Largest tub size: 6 lbs (2.72kg)
  • Servings per container: 10
  • Cost per serving: $5.99

Most gainer powders have triple-digit carb content, so if you’re looking to bulk up with a lower ratio, this may be the option for you.

With a 65:85 protein to carb ratio and low added sugars, these shakes are a great supplement to a balanced diet. They even include a lot of extra vitamins and minerals to make the calories count!

Protein Powder For Weight Gain With The Most Flavor Options

9. ALLMAX Nutrition QuickMass

  • Calories per serving: 650
  • Carbs: 85g
  • Fat: 9g
  • Protein: 60g
  • Protein source: Whey and casein
  • Flavors: Double Chocolate and Vanilla Custard
  • Largest tub size: 10 lb
  • Servings per container: 28
  • Cost per serving: $3.68

Shakes can get boring after a while, especially with the size of them when you’re intending to bulk up. 

ALLMAX Nutrition QuickMass has a great variety of flavor options you can mix and match and boasts a popular 3-to-1 carb to protein ratio.

In addition, this supplement includes NP5, a revolutionary patent-pending calorie activation technology.

Best Protein Powder For Weight Gain With Creatine

10. MuscleMeds Carnivor Mass Beef Protein

  • Calories per serving: 720
  • Carbs: 125g
  • Fat: 2.5g
  • Protein: 50g
  • Protein source: Beef protein isolate
  • Flavors: Chocolate Peanut Butter, Chocolate Fudge, Vanilla Caramel and Strawberry
  • Largest tub size: 6 lbs (2.72 kg)
  • Servings per container: 14
  • Cost per serving: $3.62

Creatine is a substance that’s found naturally in the body, and it’s also available in supplement form. It’s often used by athletes and bodybuilders to improve performance and increase muscle mass.

Creatine works by supplying energy to the muscles, which can help improve strength and power. It may also help reduce fatigue during exercise.

MuscleMeds Carnivor Mass Beef Protein is loaded up with creatine as well as blocked-chain amino acids your muscles need. With four flavors to choose from, it’s a great choice if you’re looking for a weight gain protein powder with creatine.

However, it’s important to note that not everyone responds to creatine supplements in the same way. Some people may see no benefit from taking it, while others may experience side effects.

What Do Protein Powder For Weight Gain / Mass Gainers Do?

Mass and weight gainers are sports nutrition products that are designed to help athletes and bodybuilders bulk up and gain weight. They usually come in powder form, and can be mixed with water or milk to create a shake. 

Protein powders for weight gain typically contain high levels of protein, carbs and calories, making them ideal for those who struggle to consume enough calories and nutrients through their diet alone.

While these powders can be beneficial for those trying to bulk up, it’s important to choose one that contains quality ingredients and is appropriate for your individual goals. Not all protein powders are created equal, and some may even do more harm than good.

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How To Choose A Good Protein Powder For Weight Gain For Your Needs

Here’s a look at some things to consider when selecting a protein powder for weight gain.

FAQ's

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, and truth to be told there often isn’t a universal “best time” to drink your gainers. What’s most important is that you’re getting adequate calories, protein and nutrients in general. However, general advice often recommends drinking mass gainer early in the morning and immediately after workouts.

There is no definitive answer to this question, as mass gainers can have different effects on body weight and muscle growth. Some mass gainer supplements may help to increase muscle mass, while others may cause weight gain. The best way to find which mass gainer supplement is best for you is to speak with a nutritionist or doctor who can help you create a personalized nutrition plan.

Nutritionists and weight-loss experts generally agree that mass gainer supplements can be useful for people who are trying to gain weight or muscle mass. However, there is no definitive answer as to whether mass gainer supplements should be taken every day. Some people may find that taking mass gainer supplements regularly helps them gain weight more quickly, while others may not see any significant benefits. The best way to determine whether taking mass gainer supplements daily is best for you depends on your individual goals, schedule, and workout routine.

To gain weight, you must consume more calories than you burn. Mass gainers help you do this by simply adding calories to your diet, and they’re often the easiest way to do so, but they certainly aren’t the only option.

Takeaway

While these are our top picks, it’s always best to consult a doctor or nutritionist before taking any supplements, as they may recommend alternatives.

Whether your fitness goal is to add muscle with minimal fat or to bulk up all around, there are a lot of choices out there and we hope this guide helps you compare the multitude of products!

Read more: Survey Results: The Best In Fitness & Personal Training for 2022

Eddie Lester

Eddie Lester

Eddie Lester is a personal trainer from Los Angeles and the Founder and CEO of Fitness Mentors. With over 10 years experience and 8 different certifications and specializations, as well as multiple years teaching training at a vocational college, Lester loves sharing his knowledge of practical training experience as well as how to study for PT exams. Lester is the author of Business and Sales: The Guide to Success as a Personal Trainer.

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NASM Certification- NASM Personal Training Review

NASM Certification and NASM Personal Training Review

NASM Certification:

A Review of Costs, Programs, Salary, How to Get Your CPT & More

As an aspiring personal trainer, there is a good chance you’ve considered a NASM certification to add to your list of professional accolades. There’s good reason too, NASM is considered to be a global leader in credentialing fitness professionals, and their wealth of certifications will prepare you for a promising career in personal training or one of their other areas of specializations.

Below is a NASM certification review from an actual certified NASM CPT (me), and an overview of the NASM company, the NASM CPT and other certifications, some notes on the ever popular NASM OPT model, and lots of other important information on costs, reviews, salaries, and your next steps should you choose to pursue a career with NASM.

If you are interested in becoming an Online Personal Trainer check out our How to Become an Online Personal Trainer blog.

BONUS!

If you want the head instructor Eddie Lester to text you Free NASM Test questions, study materials and bonus tips:

TEXT “NASM Questions” to 31996. 

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What is NASM?

NASM stands for the National Academy of Sports Medicine, a 30-year old company best-known for their Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) program. Within the last 10 years, NASM has certified and recertified more personal trainers than any other personal training company, helping nearly 200,000 obtain, or maintain, their CPTs all across the globe. 

NASM is also NCCA-accredited, meaning they have the National Commission for Certifying Agencies credentials, the first standards ever developed to ensure a fitness certification body has the essential elements of a high-quality program.

As a personal trainer, the global recognition and the NCCA-certification are important factors in choosing NASM as a potential candidate for your fitness education, along with utilizing the best NASM Study Tools.

 

NASM Programs

Like other fitness certification bodies, NASM is best-known for its Certified Personal Trainer program. However, they also provide a number of other specializations that are worth mentioning.

The NASM CPT is based on an evidence-based training model preparing students for real-life situations. In addition to learning and understanding complex scientific principles, students will use NASM’s proprietary Optimum Performance Training™ (OPT™) model, a systematic system that helps you train in various areas including: Flexibility, Cardiorespiratory, Core, Balance, Power, and Strength.

Cost: $699 (for the cheapest coursework)

The NASM CES is a specialization that can be applied to reduce muscular dysfunction and help you correct common movement issues. The corrective exercise continuum includes four areas, including: Inhibit, Lengthen, Activate, and Integrate. 

Exam Cost: $699 (includes course materials)

The NASM PES is designed to make athletes stronger, faster, and tougher. It uses approaches that are common in professional sports as well as exercise techniques and programs that are designed to maximize performance and minimize sports-related injury. 

Exam Cost: $599

The Behavior Change Specialization goes beyond the training elements and takes a deeper dive into motivational strategies. After completing this program, you’ll have the skill sets needed to determine your clients’ barriers to change, and design programs around their specific personalities.

Course Cost: $499 (Includes course materials and exam)

The Fitness Nutrition Specialization helps trainers explain to clients the true nutritional content of what they are eating and help them understand why they should, or shouldn’t, be eating it. This course will allow your clients to understand how to interpret food labels, select appropriate portion sizes, and eat healthy.

Course Cost: $499

The Group Personal Training Specialization is a course that helps trainers design, develop, and deliver successful group fitness training programs. In addition to the physical fitness elements of this course, trainers will also learn how to develop strategic business plans around group fitness.

Course Cost: $499

The Weight Loss Specialization uses NASM’s OPT Model to help you design weight loss programs and develop strategies to assist clients in implementing a healthier lifestyle.

Course Cost: $499

The Women’s Fitness Specialization helps trainers become more effective at training women of all body types and ages. In addition to specific nutrition recommendations, it also involves exercise and small group training coursework.

Course Cost: $299

For trainers who want to capitalize on the growing exercise demand for people aged 6 to 19, the Youth Exercise Specialization helps kids focus on sports, increase their physical fitness levels, and lose weight.

The Senior Fitness Specialization is designed to help trainers focus their exercise programs on the specific needs of seniors. This coursework includes helping seniors reduce risk, preserve independence, helps you to understand the aging process, and helps you understand the limitations of an older group of clients.

Course Cost: $199

The Golf Fitness Specialization is designed for the trainer who wants to help golfers be fit with corrective exercise strategies. While much of the focus is on injury-prevention, it also involves helping clients improve driving distance, how to increase head speed, and how to lower scores from a fitness perspective.

Course Cost: $199

The MMA Conditioning Specialization caters to the growing group of mixed martial artists who want to better condition their bodies to the rigors of MMA. It involves system design around individuals as well as group courses, and also includes nutritional and supplement guidance.

Course Cost: $299

If you want to learn more about the various specializations and my personal thoughts on them, refer to this guide on  NASM Personal Trainer Certifications.

NASM OPT Model

NASM has pioneered what is called the Optimum Performance Training (OPT™) model, a comprehensive training system that is heavily versed in scientific, evidence-based research. According to NASM, the emphasis on science makes OPT ideal for program design and delivering consistent results.

Through the improvement of functional abilities including strength, balance, power, flexibility, core stabilization, and cardio endurance, this program helps clients from a wide variety of body types and ages increase muscle mass, reduce body fat, and improve overall health.

OPT takes into account the individual and their needs, but also the environment in which they are performing. The program is not just for athletes, but also for seniors, the clinically obese, or those populations with special needs.

It starts with an assessment of goals, needs and abilities, and takes a look at a client from the front, back, and side to evaluate the kinetic chain to make sure they are moving how they should be moving. With this information, trainers can then determine what exercises they should be doing to help clients’ reach their goals.

The program is made of five phases split into three levels — stabilization, strength, and power:

  • Phase 1: Stabilization Endurance
  • Phase 2: Strength Endurance
  • Phase 3: Hypertrophy
  • Phase 4: Maximal Strength
  • Phase 5: Power

Trainers should know that they don’t need a background in kinesiology or exercise science; they will learn all of this in their CPT and touch on it in additional certifications.

NASM Certification Cost

NASM has multiple study options for aspiring trainers and they really boil down to choosing the one that is right for you. The main NASM certification that people want to know about is the NASM Certified Personal Trainer (CPT) certification. For the others, you can see the costs above.

NASM, at the time of this writing, has four study options to choose from:

  1. Self-Study $699 (Click here for 30% Off)
  2. Premium Self-Study $999 (Click here for 30% Off)
  3. Guided-Study $1,299 (Click here for 30% Off)
  4. All-Inclusive $1,999 (Click here for 30% Off)

Each option offers progressively more study assistance and assets that will help you pass the test. If you want the best NASM study materials, created by college level NASM instructors who take the exam every year, check out our Free Study Guide for NASM and our Audio Lectures, Practice Tests and Study Guide for the NASM CPT Exam.

These guides are the best on the internet and will help you save a considerable amount of money and time compared to NASM’s study packages. Our students boast a 99% pass rate, making the choice to utilize Fitness Mentors’ study materials a no-brainer!

Wondering how the NASM CPT stacks up against other CPTs in terms of cost? We put together an in-depth look at the best personal trainer certifications and did cost comparisons. Here’s how it compares to the other major personal trainer certification bodies:

 
Price Graph

As you can see, the NASM CPT is the most expensive (considering exam and study materials) of all the major certification bodies. NASM is also considered to be the most popular of these brands, and there is a certain amount of prestige that goes along with their certification.

At the same time, there are other options you should be weighing in addition to cost. For example, you should also take into consideration CEU requirements, the primary focus of education, and perhaps most importantly, if the place you want to work accepts the certification you are leaning towards.

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NASM Certification Reviews

The NASM Facebook page shows that NASM has an average review rating of 8.2 out of 10. While this is a generally favorable average, I’d encourage you to speak with some NASM trainers to gauge their experience with the test, their studies, and how a NASM CPT played into their careers.

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NASM CPT Salary

In the aforementioned blog post we did on the Best Personal Trainer Certification, we evaluated the average income of NASM, ACE, ACSM, NSCA, AFAA, and NCSF personal trainers. This data was pulled from reputable websites where registered users self-report their income.

The top tier of these incomes was with NASM, at $41,598 annually. It was followed closely by ACE at $41,546. The others were below the $40k a year annual salary. The important thing to note is that these are just averages; your ability to be successful greatly depends on your business acumen and less about the words after your name. Regardless, it is interesting to note that on average, NASM trainers make the most.

CPT Average Income

How to Get a NASM Certification

The NASM website claims that you can get your NASM CPT in as little as 10 to 12 weeks. To be eligible, you need to meet the following criteria:

  • Be at least 18 years of age 
  • Hold a current cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and an automated external defibrillator (AED) certification

From there, you simply sign up for one the aforementioned study programs on the NASM website and begin studying, then schedule a time to take the exam once you feel prepared. How do you know if you’ll be prepared? The Fitness Mentors Online Course for the NASM CPT Exam comes with a pass guarantee, so that is a good place to start.

If you have any questions, please leave them in the comments below and I will get to them as soon as possible.

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ACE CPT Review

ACE CPT Review

ACE Personal Trainer Certification Review

Considering getting your CPT with the American Council on Exercise (ACE)? Here’s an ACE CPT review to help you decide if this certification is right for you.

First and foremost, ACE is NCCA accredited, meaning the National Commission for Certifying Agencies has identified their coursework as reputable and meets the criteria for what is considered a high-quality program within the personal training industry. This also means that this CPT gives you a high likelihood of getting you a job within a gym.

It is also one of the most popular of the personal trainer certifications, with our research indicating that there are over 13,100 tests taken each year, second only to NASM. Like NASM, the cost of ACE’s study materials and test are a bit higher than most. The cheapest study package and test sits at $599, whereas some of the other CPTs fall around the $500 range.

While slightly more expensive up front, ACE looks to be a good investment as the average income of an ACE personal trainer is amongst the best in the industry. ACE personal trainers, on average, make $41,546 per year, second to only NASM trainers. Of course, there are a lot of other factors that allow a trainer to earn more, and we recommend this online course for learning many of them.

ACE also has modest continuing education (CEU) requirements. Trainers are required to take 20 hours of CEUs and the current cost is $129 to recertify every 2 years.

The exam is comprised of 150 questions, and a 62.5% or higher gets you an ACE CPT. The focus of ACE’s education is Program Design, Implementation, and Modification, meaning you’ll learn how to design programs for your clients, help them achieve success within them, and modify them as necessary as their skillsets improve.

General Consensus on Difficulty of the ACE CPT Exam

In our analysis of personal trainer exam pass rates we found that ACE was sort of middle of the road at 65%. The exam with the highest pass rate is ISSA at 89.9%, but that exam is open book.

The consensus we have heard about the exam from actual test takers is that the questions are subjective and there always seems to be more than one right answer. Another thing we frequently hear is that the ACE study materials are somewhat inconsistent with the information that is provided on the exam, making some feel inadequately prepared after solely relying on these.

This is why we recommend learning how to study for the ACE CPT but also what to study to ensure you pass the first time. The Fitness Mentors’ free ACE Study Guide will help you along your path. If you really want to get serious, check out our Premium Study Guide that focuses on the subjects that are most important to pass the ACE CPT.

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NASM Reviews: Personal Trainer Certifications – CES, FNS, PES, WLS, MMAS, GPT, YES, WFS, SFS, GFS

NASM Reviews  Personal Trainer Certifications

NASM Reviews: Personal Trainer Certifications –

CES, FNS, PES, WLS, MMAS, GPT, YES, WFS, SFS, GFS

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Watch Our Video: ACE vs NASM: Which CPT is Right for You?

NASM Reviews

Certified Personal Trainer, CPT The NASM-CPT is the most widely chosen certification among fitness professionals, making it the most widely accepted in the industry. As a future personal trainer it is important to align yourself with the most reputable certification and we believe that NASM is just that which is why we are giving you an objective way to learn about NASM reviews. The way that you receive your CPT credential is by passing the NASM CPT Exam. This is done by learning the information from the NASM CPT Textbook that is most relevant to succeeding as a personal trainer. NASM will attempt to provide you with expensive education packages ranging from $300 – $1500 dollars (on top of the $500 test), but most people agree that their education is confusing, which is probably why the pass rate is at a low 60%. The best and least expensive way to pass their exam and learn the information you need to be successful, is by purchasing the exam and textbook separately and relying on education that focuses on the test specific material. We highly recommend the Audio LecturesPractice Tests and Study Guide package (only $199) from Fitness Mentors. They go into specific detail regarding what makes it onto the test so you can better prepare yourself for what to expect. They also add the real world experiences and examples that teach you how to use the material to train your clients more effectively. Whichever way you chose to learn, the NASM certification should be your top choice as it is accepted at almost any training facility.

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Other NASM Reviews for Specialty Certifications

Extra Credentials are like super setting your favorite two body parts, it pumps you up! (insert Arnold voice). When you are already a NASM Certified Trainer, I highly recommend focusing your continuing education on sales or sticking with their other certifications, as they transfer to equal the amount of CEU’s you need to recertify (1.9 CEU’s + 0.1 CEU for CPR). When choosing your additional certs, think purpose. What credential is going to make you more valuable to the type of clientele you want to attract? Below is an honest breakdown:

Corrective Exercise Specialist, CES: People with Pain AKA almost everyone. The CES certification is far and away NASM’s best cert, as you will learn extremely applicable information. It forces you to understand origins of pain and how to fix it. My biggest concern with my training was learning how to always progress in strength, athleticism and body image, while avoiding any training associated injury. Here’s the truth, if you don’t have perfect flexibility and muscle balance, you are on your way to finding injury. In the CES materials you learn about all the mobility issues that can lead to these injuries. Beyond this, the value you can build knowing and understanding your clients’ pain is immense. Imagine you look at the most basic movement patterns of someone in their everyday life and are able to tell them about how their overactive Pec Major is giving them that shoulder pain they have been dealing with for months. They are blown away. Another great thing about this cert is that the test you have to pass, which is NASM’s hardest by far, makes sure you have completed your studies and understand these difficult topics. All of this combined makes the Corrective Exercise Specialist Certification a true educational experience that is held to the highest standard.

Fitness Nutrition Specialist, FNSPeople who want a trainer that will be able to explain more than how much brotein is in their brotein shake. AKA everyone. With a huge mess of information out there on nutrition, it is extremely important to be able to differentiate the good from the bad. When put simply we can say things like, avoid processed food; eat whole foods; avoid Trans fats, but we need to understand why these things are important. The Fitness Nutrition Specialist by NASM takes a detailed college level textbook and goes to town on understanding everything you need to know about PRO, CHO and FAT, as well as all of the vitamins and minerals, what they do and where to get them. Although there is no definitive way to eat (some may argue otherwise), being able to analyze the true nutritional content of what you are eating and understand why you are eating it, the knowledge gained through the Fitness Nutrition Specialist Certification will help you to boost your own and your clients’ fitness goals.

Performance Enhancement Specialist, PESPeople looking to perform better at a recreational sport (get real, you’re not gonna train the Kobe or Lebron), or youth athletes. AKA not many. Unless you are planning on focusing your fitness career in sports specific training or you are a competitive athlete yourself, the Performance Enhancement Specialist may be of little use. The market for sports training is not a large one, and typically caters to high school and college aged clientele, which usually don’t have room in their budget for private training.  It’s not to frequent that business men come to personal trainers looking to become a better running back or shortstop. In review of what you are learning there are great things about the PES. Through the assessments chapter you are introduced to some great sports specific assessments that can expand your repertoire when considering performance as a goal. Also they have a great Olympic xenical lowest price Lifting chapter that is essential to understand for improving explosiveness and power in sports that have those needs. Same goes for the plyometric chapter. If you like understanding concepts behind why these types of training will benefit athleticism, then the science based information throughout the book will be a great resource. Overall the PES is great, but remember it has a very specific and small market. Certifications to explore that will benefit your sports based training knowledge would be the USA-Weightlifting’s (USAW) Sports Performance Coach and National Strength and Conditioning Association’s (NSCA) Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist. These certifications are very focused on the college and pro level setting and it would not be easy to carry out their training programs in your typical commercial gym.

Weight Loss Specialist, WLSNASM’s attempt to teach you the same stuff you already know and charge you for it; it does sound pretty badass though; AKA Fat People or 70% of the Population. Where is the Jacked and Tan Specialist? I may sound a little harsh towards this certification, only because they beat the law of thermodynamics to death (calories in vs calories out). When will NASM jump off the government recommended nutrition band wagon and realized there is more to altering body composition; ie. Hormonal OptimizationMacronutrient Ratios, and eating low inflammatory profile foods to name a few. Unfortunately they don’t discuss any alternative methods to weight loss, and just repeat what you already know, to slightly more detail. I do have to say that having this title will make you sound great, but recognize your investment in furthering your education provides little return.

Mixed Martial Arts Specialist, MMASA way to manage a group exercise program that tries to do MMA moves, but mainly just makes people look like they are convulsing. But it does make you sexy to clients that want to train like fighters even though you have no clue what that really means, unless you have a previous martial arts or boxing background. AKA Is this your target audience? Then get it. Similar to the Weight loss Specialist, if you expect to get great insight into how to train someone like MMA fighters you are understandably mislead. Mixed Martial Artists are athletes and you are better off applying the PES principles to understand and program toward the demand of the sport, rather than take them through circuit training with added kicks, knees and elbows. I really only see this as a clever way to capitalize on the recent MMA influenced fitness training boom. Once again the education is lacking, so the title is all you’re really paying for.

Group Personal Training Specialist, GPTReally? AKA you don’t need this as you already know how to do it. Did you know that no gyms require you to have this to train their group exercise classes? I can only see this benefiting you in a few ways; one of them being that you’re starting a boot camp or private group class and want to bring attention to the fact that you are qualified, and the other being that you really suck at training groups and you need more insight, which is unlikely. If you fall into one of these categories I guess you could try it?

Women’s Fitness Specialist, WFSWomen? Are they that much different that they need their own cert? Is this your Target Market? AKA 51% of the population. If you’re a female I’m pretty sure you know what’s going on. If you’re a male, you’re just creepy. Sounds ok but you decide. I will be waiting for the Men’s Fitness Specialist to arrive. Any day now…

Youth Exercise Specialist, YESTeach them how to play and perform speed, agility and quickness drills. AKA you don’t need this unless you directly work with kids in Beverly Hills and need to convince their Type A moms that you are certified to work with little Joey. The special considerations for youth can be found in chapter 16 in the NASM Essentials of Personal Fitness Training Textbook. The additional information in this cert does not add to much benefit beyond what the basic standards are for youth training.

Senior Fitness Specialist, SFSRefer to CES. AKA get the CES. Great title if this is your main focus for your business. Besides that your money is better spent on learning ways to address musculoskeletal pain.

Golf Fitness Specialist, GFSPlan on training Tiger? Do you already kick ass at golf? Is this your Target Market? AKA Not many golfers realize they suck because they have zero thoracic mobilityAnd that’s how many would train with you. I love golf. If you love golf this does provide some great baseline knowledge for you to build upon in the real world, but check out the Titleist Performance Institute if you are serious about getting to golf training.

Highly Recommended: CES, FNS, PES

Honorable Mention: MMAS, WLS just because they make you seem like a bad ass.

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Convinced NASM is the way to go?

Your next steps for NASM certification:

  1. Call NASM to Purchase the Exam-only Package: 800-460-6276
  2. Get Fitness Mentors’ Audio Lectures, Practice Tests, and Study Guide for the NASM CPT Exam: Click Here
  3. Begin Your Studies Using the Fitness Mentors’ 4 & 8-week Study Timeline
  4. Schedule Your Exam at a NASM-approved Test Center: 800-211-2754
  5. Begin Your Career as a NASM Certified Personal Trainer!

Written by:

Eddie Lester BS, NASM-CPT, CES, PES, FNS, WLS, MMAS, GFS, YES, SFS

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